Archive for the ‘Universal Transfers’ Category

New Zealand’s universal pension is in danger

Saturday, June 16th, 2018

New Zealand has a universal pension scheme that is the envy of the world. It is simple, affordable, and eliminates poverty in old age. When a qualified resident reaches the state pension age, he or she receives a basic, flat pension, regardless of income, wealth or employment history. This benefit, called ‘Superannuation’, is financed from general government revenue. Earmarked taxes are not levied to support it, but benefits are taxable as regular income, so net benefits are lower for pensioners who have income from work or from savings. (more…)

old age pensions in the Philippines

Sunday, May 27th, 2018

In January 2017, the government of the Philippines increased social security pensions by 1,000 pesos (19 US dollars) a month without any increase in contributions. Simultaneously, the government reduced income taxes. A young Philippine economist writes that this was bad policy first because it increases government deficits and second because it helps the wealthy at the expense of the poor.

Fewer than a third of the country’s workers have access to any retirement pension at all. The vast majority of pensions are from the social security system, and the beneficiaries are not exactly poor. Increasing their pensions by increasing deficit spending does not help those who do not participate in the social security system, so have no entitlement to a pension in old age.

It would be much better, this economist believes, for government to introduce a universal pension, payable to all residents from the age of 60. I agree, and am pleased to see this call for a simple, universal pension in a country with so much poverty.

All in all, the yawning gaps of the country’s social pension system require bold, comprehensive, and forward-thinking solutions like universal social pension – not simplistic, superficial, and short-sighted ones like [Rodrigo] Duterte’s pension hike. ….
(more…)

universal health care and universal pensions

Friday, April 27th, 2018

This week’s Economist magazine contains a superb leader, “Universal health care, worldwide, is within reach“. Reading it, it occurred to me that many of the points in it apply equally to universal basic income for older persons.

In a major section of the leader, titled “How the other half dies”, I did little more than substitute “universal basic pensions” for “universal basic health care”, and came up with the following essay. (more…)

pre-funding social pensions in Bermuda

Sunday, April 22nd, 2018

At least some residents of Bermuda, a wealthy self-governing British Overseas Territory in the North Atlantic Ocean, with a tiny population of 63,779, are worried that government has not saved enough to pre-fund its noncontributory old-age pension promises. Benefits as of 2015 were US$103.81 a week for residents aged 65 and older with total annual income greater than $4,000 and US$106.83 a week for residents with less income. Additional requirements are citizenship and at least 10 years of continuous residence in Bermuda in the past 20 years. (more…)

private and social pensions in Latin America

Sunday, April 8th, 2018

FIAP (Federación Internacional de Administradoras de Fondos de Pensiones/International Federation of Pension Funds Administrators), the Latin American trade group of private administrators of government-mandated contributory pensions, now acknowledges the need for social pensions, financed from general government revenue. Private managers of Latin American pension funds in the past tended to ignore social pensions, at least in part because these provide little or no opportunity for private profit.

A recent 9-page FIAP report begins by explaining the need for social pensions: (more…)

call for universal pensions in the Philippines

Saturday, March 31st, 2018

Senator Grace Poe has filed a Bill to provide all citizens aged 60 years and older a monthly pension of P1,500 (US$29). (more…)

debating universal basic income

Thursday, February 15th, 2018

Universal Basic Income (UBI) seems like an idea whose time has come, given the widespread fear of workers that their jobs are threatened by automation (robots). Nonetheless, there are many who oppose the UBI, often on grounds that giving people “money for nothing” will discourage work. I never found this argument to be convincing. Means-tested (targeted) benefits almost always require an able-bodied person to be unemployed to receive benefits. In short, government pays citizens for not working. The unemployed who find jobs lose their benefits. A UBI, in contrast, does not require recipients to be unemployed, so does not discourage work. (more…)

Kenya launches universal pensions

Sunday, January 21st, 2018

Beginning this month – January 2018 – every resident of Kenya over the age of 70 years is entitled to a pension funded solely by general government revenue. The pension is modest, and the age of entitlement is high, but it is an excellent beginning. Previously, only 240,000 of the 390,000 Kenyan citizens over 70 years of age received means-tested, targeted pension benefits. Targeting will continue for social pensions given to persons between the ages of 65 and 69 years. (more…)

call for universal healthcare and pensions for India’s elderly

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

We should start looking at universal health insurance for the elderly, not restricting it to merely BPL [below poverty line] patients, but extending it to the middle-class as well. We need helplines, the establishment of a national trust for the aged and a national commission for senior citizens. Sadly, as a society, we do not care for our elderly and hence the lack of will.

The government needs [also] … to help future generations benefit and live longer … with some sort of a universal pension plan.

Poonam Muttreja, “Too little done to provide elderly with social, financial security“, Deccan Chronicle, 17 January 2018.

Ms. Poonam Muttreja heads the Population Foundation of India (PFI), a New Delhi-based NGO. The Deccan Chronicle is published in Hyderabad (Telangana) and other Deccan regions, including Kerala. The newspaper has more than a million subscribers.

The BPL is supposed to identify families living in extreme poverty, but its application is very uneven, inefficient and corrupt. Many families who are poor enough to qualify are excluded, while non-poor families are often counted as poor.

Only 18% of India’s population over 60 years of age have access to a monthly social pension of 200 Rupees (3 US$), and the beneficiaries are not India’s poorest.

 

universal basic income (UBI)

Friday, December 8th, 2017

UBI is an old idea whose time has come due especially to the threat of automation. The idea is simple. Provide each adult with a benefit large enough to cover his or her basic needs. A smaller sum would be allocated to parents for each child. It his important that the benefit not be means-tested, i.e. that it be universal. Otherwise, paid employment would be discouraged. Recipients of income from work and savings would be taxed at normal rates, normally not higher than 50%. (more…)