tips for personal investors

It is best to ignore short-term fluctuations in financial markets. “Staggering amounts of time and intellectual energy,” writes Miles Johnson, Capital Markets Editor of the FT, “are expended by market watchers who treat the latest leg up or down in US Treasuries or stock markets as imbued with meaning, only to reverse their view the following week.”

Benjamin Graham (1894-1976), a British-born American economist and investor, would agree. A prudent investor should either buy-and-hold, when prices are steady, or purchase assets when the price is low, and sell when they are high. Most investors do the opposite. Graham’s seminal text on investing, The Intelligent Investor, was first published in 1949, and reprinted many times before and after his death. It is still relevant today, and continues to be ignored by most investors.

Ben Graham, the famed father of value investing, used the analogy of the market as a business partner so mentally unstable he would on some days offer to sell you his share for a rock bottom price, and on better days would ask for a stratospheric valuation. This character, Mr Graham noted, would be a fantastic person to do business with.

“Price fluctuations have only one significant meaning for the true investor,” he wrote. “They provide him with an opportunity to buy wisely when prices fall sharply and to sell wisely when they advance a great deal. At other times he will do better if he forgets about the stock market.”

Miles Johnson, “Beware the all-knowing macro forecasting genius“, Financial Times, 19 February 2018 (gated paywall).

 

Tags: ,

Comments are closed.